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Music Spanning Curriculum

“The things I learned from my experience in music in school are discipline, perseverance, dependability, composure, courage and pride in results. . . Not a bad preparation for the workforce!”

- Gregory Anrig, President, Educational Testing Service


Ten Examples of How Music Makes a Difference in Education


1. The Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania School District analyzed its 1997 dropout rate in terms of students’ musical experience. Students with no ensemble performance experience had a dropout rate of 7.4 percent. Students with one to two years of ensemble experience had a dropout rate of 1 percent, and those with three or more years of performance experience had a dropout rate of 0.0 percent.

Eleanor Chute, “Music and Art Lessons Do More Than Complement Three R’s,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 13, 1998.


2. Music students out-perform non-music on achievement tests in reading and math. Skills such as reading, anticipating, memory, listening, forecasting, recall, and concentration are developed in musical performance, and these skills are valuable to students in math, reading, and science.

- B. Friedman, “An Evaluation of the Achievement in Reading and Arithmetic of Pupils in Elementary School Instrumental Music Classes,” Dissertation Abstracts International.


3. Students who can perform complex rhythms can also make faster and more precise corrections in many academic and physical situations, according to the Center for Timing, Coordination, and Motor Skills.

- Rhythm seen as key to music’s evolutionary role in human intellectual development, Center for Timing, Coordination, and Motor Skills, 2000.


4. In a 2000 survey, 73 percent of respondents agree that teens who play an instrument are less likely to have discipline problems.

- Americans Love Making Music – And Value Music Education More Highly Than Ever, American Music Conference, 2000.


5. College admissions officers continue to cite participation in music as an important factor in making admissions decisions. They claim that music participation demonstrates time management, creativity, expression, and open-mindedness.

- Carl Hartman, “Arts May Improve Students’ Grades,” The Associated Press, October, 1999.


6. A two-year Swiss study involving 1,200 children in 50 schools showed that students involved in the music program were better at languages, learned to read more easily, showed an improved social climate, demonstrated more enjoyment in school, and had a lower stress level than non-music students.

- E.W. Weber, M. Spychiger, and J.L. Patry, 1993.


7. A ten-year study indicates that students who study music achieve higher test scores, regardless of socioeconomic background.

- Dr. James Catterall, UCLA.


8. In a 1999 Columbia University study, students in the arts are found to be more cooperative with teachers and peers, more self-confident, and better able to express their ideas. These benefits exist across socioeconomic levels.

- The Arts Education Partnership, 1999.


9. A 1997 Gallup Survey on Americans’ attitudes toward music revealed that 89% of respondents believe music helps a child’s overall development, and 93% believe that music is part of a well-rounded education.

- Americans’ Attitudes Toward Music, The Gallup Organization, 1997.


10. Nine out of ten adults and teenagers who play instruments agree that music making brings the family closer together.

- Music Making and Our Schools, American Music Conference, 2000.

The Youth Beatz Mission

  • Safe, Positive, Productive Enrichment

  • Inspire through Positive Mentoring

  • Build Self-Respect & Respect for Others

  • Build Self-Confidence, Self-Control and Teamwork Skills

  • Engage in Creative Expression

  • Participate in Rhythmic Aerobic Workouts

  • Improve Focus & Effort in Academics

  • Social Inclusion through Participation & Performance

  • Develop Positive Community Members

  • Burn Off Extra Energy

  • Have FUN!!!

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